Tag Archives: tofu

Herbed Spaetzle (GF, V) with Roasted Garlic and Beet Puree – Virtual Vegan Potluck 2013

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Winner of Best Side Dish at the November 2013 Virtual Vegan Potluck!

Welcome to your next side dish in this November’s Virtual Vegan Potluck! I am so excited about this potluck because I know I will gain such an abundant of new and delicious plant-based recipes for my upcoming holiday entertaining.

For the last potluck, I brought a Spring salad that contained a veggie that was fairly unique to many readers.  I am hoping, too, that this dish will elicit your curiousity, light fire to your taste buds and have you rushing like mad to your stove top.

However, I am betting you are already in your kitchen (or just crazy anxious to get there!) from reading all the previous potluck posts! (Grab a beverage and click here, if you need to go back to the beginning).

I am so excited about sharing this recipe with you! It’s been hard keeping it a secret for the past month.

Today, I am bringing to our table a savoury dish that is nutritious and satisfying, even for those carnivorous bellies. It was my Swiss and Austrian in-laws who first introduced me to this little noodle we call spaetzle.  It typically would be at our table on special occasions like New Year’s Eve and Thanksgiving. It’s such a treat that my husband and I served it our wedding reception nearly 17 years ago.

Traditionally, spaetzle consisted of flour, eggs, salt and water.  I enhanced the traditional recipe by not only eliminating the use of eggs, but by using a flour that is nutritionally superior to most.

For me, this recipe is another great example of how eliminating animal-based foods and gluten from your diet does not have you living without the dishes you so love.

Here is my side dish – an embellished, veganized and gluten-free version of the traditional “egg” noodle called spaetzle – topped with a roasted garlic and beet pureeHerbed Spaetzle

HERBED SPAETZLE

  • 2 flax eggs
  • 1/4 organic soft tofu
  • 1 tablespoon garlic powder
  • 1 tablespoon quinoa flakes
  • 1 cup sorghum flour
  • 1/2 cup tapioca flour
  • 1/4 cup potato starch
  • 1/2 teaspoon xanthan gum (or guar gum for corn free)
  • salt and pepper
  • filtered room temperature water (approximately 150 – 200 mL)
  • finely chopped chives or green onion and parsley

Dough: In a medium-sized mixing bowl, blend flax eggs with tofu. In a separate bowl, combine garlic powder, quinoa flakes, flours, tapioca starch, gums and salt and pepper.  Alternately, add water and dry ingredients (about a 1/2 cup at a time) to flax and tofu mixture. ***You will need a viscous dough, so adjust water accordingly. Mix slightly after each addition. Using a wooden spoon, mix in chopped herbs.  Let dough sit for 30 minutes or longer.

Now, this is where it really gets FUN! 🙂

Bring a large pot of water to a boil.  Prepare a cookie sheet by lining it with parchment paper.  Sit a colander in a large bowl and have it next to your pot of boiling water.

I prefer to use a spaetzle maker over a pot of boiling water to form the noodles. You can use a colander, but a spaetzle maker is so much easier and it really is an inexpensive kitchen gadget. (Great stocking stuffer, by the way!).

Using a soup ladle, scoop your viscous spaetzle dough in the “pot” of your spaetzle maker. Slowly, run the “pot” back and forth on the spaetzle maker’s track. The dough will drip down into the pot of boiling water and float to the top as spaetzle noodles. After a couple of minutes, scoop the spaetzle out of the pot with a slotted spoon and drain them in your colander. Once excess water has drained from the spaetzle, scatter them on your parchment lined cookie sheet.  Keep spaetzle in a low temperature oven, if planning to serve after all dough is cooked.

Spaetzle can be made a day or two in advance.  Once all noodles have been cooked, drained and brought to room temperature, they can be kept in glass containers in the fridge. To reheat spaetzle for serving, either drop noodles once again into a pot of boiling water then immediately scoop or fry in a non-stick frying pan. Spaetzle noodles are awesome fried with onions and garlic. 😉

Top plated spaetzle with warm beet puree and garnish with parsley.

ROASTED GARLIC AND BEET PUREE

  • 5 medium-sized beets, cooked and peeled(I used a pressure cooker)
  • 1 garlic head, roasted
  • 2 tablespoons lemon juice
  • 1 tablespoon tahini
  • 1 tablespoon maple syrup

Bring beets and garlic to room temperature. Place all ingredients in a food processor and blend well.

Thank you for joining our potluck! Enjoy the rest of your dishes!

Your next delicious side dish is brought to you by Lemongrass and Ginger.  Click here:

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If you missed the side dish from Robin Robertson’s Global Vegan Kitchen, then go back here:

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Grilled Teriyaki Veggie Kebobs

We just returned home from another fabulous few days at the family cottage.  The weather was beautiful, but a little on the cool side for swimming.  At least it was for me.  A good northerly wind certainly didn’t stop the kids.  Do they ever get cold?

It was a great weekend! My mother-in-law and father-in-law from Toronto joined us for some delicious gluten-free and vegan meals.  I am absolutely thrilled that they enjoy my cooking and are so willing to try new dishes.  This recipe received many compliments from the young to the old.  So, I just have to share it!

Around mid-morning on Saturday,  Bailey, our little chef in the making, carefully threaded an assortment of cut vegetables (organic tofu, sweet peppers, zucchini, cherry tomatoes, and cremini mushrooms) on some pre-soaked skewers.  She did make a special one with only tofu, as a treat for all her hard work. 😉

The uncooked kebobs were placed in a glass container with a lid.  The lid allowed for a “shake and twirl” during the marinating process.

The veggie kebobs were marinated in a delicious Teriyaki Sauce adapted from Lindsay Nixon’s cookbook Everyday Happy Herbivore.  Like all of Nixon’s recipes, this sauce contains no added oil, which you tend to find in so many sauces and marinades.  I went with a Teriyaki flavour because it was requested by “Kay”, my 14 year-old.   A super choice, if I do say so myself!  I left the kebobs to marinate in the fridge for a good portion of the day while we enjoyed the beauty of the lake.

That evening, under my husband’s supervision, Bailey grilled the kebobs while Oma made a mixed green salad and I prepared some brown rice.  The kebobs were grilled on a relatively low heat for about 15 – 20 minutes.  They were turned often to avoid  charring.  (We are not a fan of charred veggies).  Using a cook’s brush, Bailey applied a bit of marinade to each kebob as they were cooking.  Since there was no oil in the marinade,  there were no flare-ups. 🙂

I really wish I had a photo of the finished product on a bed of brown rice.  I just wasn’t thinking.  We were three-quarters of the way through our meal when I realized that I had forgotten a plated photo.  Unfortunately, this is typical for me.  I’ll blame it on my impatient stomach.

Here is the recipe.  Enjoy!

TERIYAKI MARINADE

  • 1 cup water
  • 1/4 cup coconut aminos*  (or gluten-free and organic soy sauce)
  • 1 tbsp arrowroot starch (cornstarch would work, too)
  • about 1 tsp of grated ginger
  • about 1 tsp of minced garlic
  • a little lemon juice
  • 3 tsp coconut sugar (or light brown sugar)
  • dash of red pepper flakes

Whisk well all the above ingredients in a saucepan.  Bring to a boil.  Once at a boil, remove the saucepan from the heat and whisk for a couple more minutes.  Let cool.

Once cooled, pour marinade over container of uncooked veggie kebobs.  You may want to reserve a little marinade in a bowl to be used during the grilling.  Place container of kebobs and marinade in the refrigerator.

Occasionally turn the kebobs  to allow sauce to coat each and every vegetable.

* I used coconut aminos to replace the soy sauce in this recipe.  Many individuals have an intolerance to soy and my husband is one.  Using coconut aminos allowed him to enjoy the Teriyaki flavour of our grilled vegetables without any digestive upsets.  As for the kebobs, he removed the tofu and shared it with other family members. 

Please note that there is absolutely no need to go on a frantic search for a “meat alternative”, like tofu for these kebobs.  A varied, whole foods, plant-based diet is perfectly healthy and contains all the protein your body needs.  Tofu is certainly not necessary to make these kebobs a complete meal!

Interested in learning more about tofu and soy?  Check out my thoughts here

Here are a couple of beautiful photos my daughter took this weekend of the lake. 🙂 She so wanted a loon or osprey shot!  Maybe next time.

Kale and Leek Tofu Frittatas

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For my family , tofu frittatas have become that go-to food you pull out of the freezer when your day goes awry and you don’t have time to whip up something healthy.   When my daughter was eating these en route to the skating rink this past week, I knew I had to post the recipe.  So many of us struggle to find a healthy snack or meal for our kids when life just gets too busy.  Tofu frittatas are that perfect “finger food” that will prevent you from making a quick stop at your local fast food restaurant.

I used Elisa Ray’s tofu frittata recipe from her plant-based and allergy-friendly blog, eating whole.  I made one substitution (kale for spinach) and one addition (leek) from her original recipe in hopes that they would mimic the mini quiches I used to make quite frequently for the kids.  My daughters said they taste just like those quiches and I am thrilled!  No eggs, dairy, or gluten in this recipe!  Add whatever veggies suit your fancy.  Our favourite combination is kale and leek.

Instead of eggs, a block of firm tofu is the base of this recipe.  I recommend that you use an organic tofu in all of your tofu recipes.  Tofu is made from soybeans and right now in Canada and the U.S., nearly all non-organic soybeans are genetically modified.  If you are at all confused about soy or tofu, I suggest you read this – one of my earlier posts.  Hopefully, this will clarify things for you.

If you have small children, use your mini muffin pan and make mini frittatas.  Actually, my ten year-old daughter has renamed these as tofu bites.  They are a perfect size for small mouths.  They are also a perfect size for when you are on the go and wish for a mess-free trip. 😉

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Shanghai-Style Noodle Soup

As many of you are aware, I absolutely LOVE to travel.  This is one reason why I have chosen to eat so well.  There are just too many spectacular places on this earth to encounter in one lifetime.  I do not have the time to get sick.  I want to remain healthy and energetic for as long as I can so that I can experience all the wonders of this beautiful world.

Last Thursday I had the opportunity to accompany my husband to Shanghai for the weekend.  Yes, the weekend.  I know it’s a long flight (14 hours) and my time there not as long as I would like, but I gladly accepted the offer.  Seeing the world in short spurts will suffice for now.

During my short stay, I fell in love with Chinese Noodle Soup.  Actually, I became addicted to this meal and had it for breakfast and dinner on all 3 days.  When I returned home, I was to sure to stop by the grocery store for its ingredients.  I wanted to share this simple, warming, and aromatic dish with my children.  Their reaction – “Mom you should make this more often!!”.  I think I might just do that.

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SHANGHAI-STYLE NOODLE SOUP

  • 2 tablespoons sesame oil
  • 2 garlic cloves, minced
  • 1 tablespoon ginger, minced
  • 4 cups gluten-free, organic vegetable broth
  • 300 g dried mixed mushrooms*, soaked in 2 cups of broth for 5 minutes
  • 454 g organic tofu, cubed and stir-fried in sesame oil until lightly browned
  • 198 g stir-fry rice noodles, soaked in boiling water for approximately 4 minutes then drained
  • 2 cups baby bok choy, chopped
  • 250 g fresh bean sprouts
  • gluten-free soya sauce (I used Bragg’s liquid soy seasoning), if desired

Heat sesame oil over medium heat.  Stirring constantly, cook garlic and ginger for about 2 minutes.  Add vegetable broth, mushrooms, tofu, and bok choy.  Heat to boiling, then let simmer for 5 minutes.

In a large soup bowl, add cooked rice noodles.  Ladle broth and vegetables into bowl over noodles.  Add a handful of bean sprouts to bowl and stir soup.

Add a dash or two of soya sauce if desired.

* China is the world’s largest edible mushroom producer.  A bowl of noodle soup in Shanghai contains such a vast array of mixed mushrooms (shitake, tree oyster, chanterelle, and black trumpets, just to name a few – some of which I had never had the pleasure of tasting until this visit.  Try not to settle for white button mushrooms.  I found a wonderful bag of locally grown assorted dried mushrooms in a nearby natural food store.  What a wonderful flavour it brought to this soup!

Mushrooms are high in fiber, high in protein and contain B vitamins. They are considered the “meat” of the vegetable world.  I think I may become a mycophagist! 😉

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