Tag Archives: vegetarian

Grilled Teriyaki Veggie Kebobs

We just returned home from another fabulous few days at the family cottage.  The weather was beautiful, but a little on the cool side for swimming.  At least it was for me.  A good northerly wind certainly didn’t stop the kids.  Do they ever get cold?

It was a great weekend! My mother-in-law and father-in-law from Toronto joined us for some delicious gluten-free and vegan meals.  I am absolutely thrilled that they enjoy my cooking and are so willing to try new dishes.  This recipe received many compliments from the young to the old.  So, I just have to share it!

Around mid-morning on Saturday,  Bailey, our little chef in the making, carefully threaded an assortment of cut vegetables (organic tofu, sweet peppers, zucchini, cherry tomatoes, and cremini mushrooms) on some pre-soaked skewers.  She did make a special one with only tofu, as a treat for all her hard work. 😉

The uncooked kebobs were placed in a glass container with a lid.  The lid allowed for a “shake and twirl” during the marinating process.

The veggie kebobs were marinated in a delicious Teriyaki Sauce adapted from Lindsay Nixon’s cookbook Everyday Happy Herbivore.  Like all of Nixon’s recipes, this sauce contains no added oil, which you tend to find in so many sauces and marinades.  I went with a Teriyaki flavour because it was requested by “Kay”, my 14 year-old.   A super choice, if I do say so myself!  I left the kebobs to marinate in the fridge for a good portion of the day while we enjoyed the beauty of the lake.

That evening, under my husband’s supervision, Bailey grilled the kebobs while Oma made a mixed green salad and I prepared some brown rice.  The kebobs were grilled on a relatively low heat for about 15 – 20 minutes.  They were turned often to avoid  charring.  (We are not a fan of charred veggies).  Using a cook’s brush, Bailey applied a bit of marinade to each kebob as they were cooking.  Since there was no oil in the marinade,  there were no flare-ups. 🙂

I really wish I had a photo of the finished product on a bed of brown rice.  I just wasn’t thinking.  We were three-quarters of the way through our meal when I realized that I had forgotten a plated photo.  Unfortunately, this is typical for me.  I’ll blame it on my impatient stomach.

Here is the recipe.  Enjoy!

TERIYAKI MARINADE

  • 1 cup water
  • 1/4 cup coconut aminos*  (or gluten-free and organic soy sauce)
  • 1 tbsp arrowroot starch (cornstarch would work, too)
  • about 1 tsp of grated ginger
  • about 1 tsp of minced garlic
  • a little lemon juice
  • 3 tsp coconut sugar (or light brown sugar)
  • dash of red pepper flakes

Whisk well all the above ingredients in a saucepan.  Bring to a boil.  Once at a boil, remove the saucepan from the heat and whisk for a couple more minutes.  Let cool.

Once cooled, pour marinade over container of uncooked veggie kebobs.  You may want to reserve a little marinade in a bowl to be used during the grilling.  Place container of kebobs and marinade in the refrigerator.

Occasionally turn the kebobs  to allow sauce to coat each and every vegetable.

* I used coconut aminos to replace the soy sauce in this recipe.  Many individuals have an intolerance to soy and my husband is one.  Using coconut aminos allowed him to enjoy the Teriyaki flavour of our grilled vegetables without any digestive upsets.  As for the kebobs, he removed the tofu and shared it with other family members. 

Please note that there is absolutely no need to go on a frantic search for a “meat alternative”, like tofu for these kebobs.  A varied, whole foods, plant-based diet is perfectly healthy and contains all the protein your body needs.  Tofu is certainly not necessary to make these kebobs a complete meal!

Interested in learning more about tofu and soy?  Check out my thoughts here

Here are a couple of beautiful photos my daughter took this weekend of the lake. 🙂 She so wanted a loon or osprey shot!  Maybe next time.

Just Another Manic Monday!

One pot meals are pretty big in our house during the weekdays.  Between work and the kids’ school projects and activities, it can be a challenge getting the family to sit down at the table for any length of time.  For us, it’s ideal having our meal in one big bowl.

This Spanish rice dish is so versatile.  You can add any chunky vegetable that happens to be in your refrigerator.  For this particular dish, I used eggplant, red pepper, onion, garlic, fresh tomatoes and a can of Eden adzuki beans.   This dish works wonders with chickpeas or green lentils, too!

eggplantpaella

This recipe is inspired by one of my first vegetarian cookbooks, “The Ultimate Vegetarian Cookbook” by Roz Denny.  I bought this shortly after I moved into my first apartment and discovered that I can’t survive off of steamed rice and veggies for the rest of my life!  Many of the recipes are vegan and many I have easily altered to a gluten-free recipe.

CHUNKY EGGPLANT AND ADZUKI BEAN PAELLA

  • good pinch of saffron strands
  • 1 eggplant, cut in thick chunks
  • sea salt
  • 6 tbsp olive oil
  • 1 large onion, sliced
  • 3 garlic cloves, crushed
  • 1 red pepper, sliced
  • 2 tsp paprika
  • 1 1/4 cups risotto rice
  • 2 1/2 cups vegetable stock
  • 2 medium sized tomatoes, chopped
  • ground black pepper
  • 1 can of adzuki beans*  (Eden brand)

Steep the saffron in 3 tbsp of hot water.  Sprinkle the eggplant with salt and leave to drain in a colander for about 30 minutes.  Rinse eggplant and pat dry.

In a large frying pan, heat the oil and fry the onion, garlic peppers and eggplant for a few minutes.  Sprinkle in the paprika and stir.

Mix the rice, then pour in the stock, tomatoes, saffron and salt and pepper.  Bring to a boil then simmer for about 15 minutes, uncovered.  Stir occasionally.

Stir in the adzuki beans and continue to cook for another 10 minutes.  Serve hot from the pan.

Now if you really want to eat this paella-style, then place the pan in the center of your dining room table and give everyone a fork to eat it directly from the pan!  Less dishes, less clean-up! 😉

* Adzuki beans are small red beans high in protein and high in fiber.  They are also high in iron, potassium, folate and magnesium.  Adzuki beans are the second most popular legume in Japan, next to the soybean.  You may also find adzuki beans in some delicious desserts.  Remember….if you are using canned beans, don’t forget to look for the Eden brand.  All Eden cans are BPA free.

Indian-Spiced Lentil Hemp Patties

lentil patties 

This recipe comes from one of my favourite vegan cookbooks and resource, “Whole Foods to Thrive: Nutrient-Dense, Plant-Based Recipes for Peak Health” by Brendan Brazier.   Brendan, a plant-based nutrition expert, is the formulator of Vega products and a professional triathlete. I have met him twice  and each time I am clearly “star struck”.

On with the recipe…..

Turmeric, ginger, coriander and cumin spices give this dish a very distinct flavour.  These “wonder” spices are high in antioxidants, ease digestion and help tame inflammation – beneficial for those suffering from arthritis, Chron’s, IBS and other inflammatory conditions.

I love the amount of protein in these guys.  This recipe contains 1 ¼ cups cooked red lentils which is over 18 grams of protein.   Also, the hemp seeds in this recipe, albeit only 3 tablespoons,  add roughly an additional 20 grams!  If you ate all of these patties at once,  and believe me you’ll be tempted to do so,  you would be getting a good portion of your daily protein requirement.

These patties are a wonderful make ahead meal and they are super easy to prepare.   If I do have extra time, I like to make smaller patties and place some in the freezer for those crazy, busy nights.   They travel well in small containers and can be eaten as finger food – perfect when eating out for lunch or dinner (at the skating rink on most nights, in our case).   Hope you enjoy this uber-nutritious dish!

 

INDIAN-SPICED LENTIL HEMP PATTIES

  • 2-3 tbsp. coconut oil*, for frying
  • 1 cup diced yellow onion,
  • 1 cup diced red pepper*
  • 1 celery stalk, minced
  • 6 medium cloves garlic, minced
  • ¼ tsp ginger powder
  • 1 tsp coriander powder
  • 1 tsp cumin powder
  • ½ tsp turmeric
  • ½ cup hemp seeds
  • 3 tbsp ground flaxseeds
  • 1 ¼ cups cooked red lentils
  • ½ tsp sea salt, or to taste

Melt the coconut oil over medium heat and saute the onion, celery, and red pepper until the vegetables are soft.  Add the garlic and saute for about 1 more minute.  Remove vegetables from the heat and let cool .  Scoop mixture into a food processor or large mixing bowl.

Add the remaining ingredients to the vegetable mixture.  Pulse mixture a few times in a food processor or, if you do not have a food processor, mash some lentils with a fork. (Lentils that are well mashed make it easier to form patties). Adjust salt as needed.  Hand shape mixture into patties of desired size.

Heat a small amount of coconut oil in a large frying pan over low heat. Cook patties until brown on both sides.

*Coconut oil, made from the fat found in the meat of a coconut, is one of the best oils for frying. Unlike other oils, coconut oil does not lose its antioxidant benefits or nutritional value when heated. I love the flavour that it adds to dishes – a little nutty, a little like coconut. When shopping for coconut oil, choose virgin oil over refined. Virgin oil means that the fat was not extracted using chemicals.

*Red peppers, as well as other nightshade vegetables, have been known to aggravate inflammation in the body. It may be wise to eliminate this vegetable from the patties, if one suffers from any inflammatory conditions.

I have to share this one!  Here I am chatting with Brendan Brazier at “The Seed: A Vegan Experience” in New York City, June 2012.

Brendan Brazier